fraught

While reading the latest (and last, alas) Harry Potter book — Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — I came across the sentence below and jumped on it as an example of incorrect word usage:

Dealings between wizards and goblins have been fraught for centuries — but you’ll know that from History of Magic.

Fraught means loaded, charged, marked by or causing distress. I have long believed that with must always follow fraught. It seemed to me that the sentence above should actually read like this:

Dealings between wizards and goblins have been fraught with tension for centuries — but you’ll know that from History of Magic.

As it turns out, my version is correct.  But  that doesn’t mean that J.K. Rawling’s version is incorrect.  Here is another example of using fraught alone:

When he heard Sara’s tragic account of the fraught mother-daughter relationship, he was horrified.

Use fraught either with or without with. Either way is correct.

For more free writing tips and guidelines, free articles, and a free introductory consultation, visit Treasurefield Communications.

Advertisements

About 123clear

I translate foggy information into plain English.
This entry was posted in word usage. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s