Me, Myself, and I

The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th ed., advises against using myself as a pronoun in place of I or me. Here’s an example of a journalist who doesn’t heed that advice, or at least didn’t in this case:

In the summer of 1973, unbeknownst to most of the public – particularly myself because I spent nearly every waking hour of that summer driving an ice cream truck – Richard Nixon and his wily cats John Erlichman and Robert “Bob” Haldeman were trying to appease the public and congress by batting around half-truths about the Watergate burglary and cover-up.

A more grammatically-kosher way to write this sentence would be to replace myself with me–and also add a comma:

In the summer of 1973, unbeknownst to most of the public – particularly me, because I spent nearly every waking hour of that summer driving an ice cream truck. . .

Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary defines myself as a reflexive pronoun, “a pronoun referring to the sentence, clause, or verbal phrase in which it stands.” Use a reflexive pronoun for emphasis, as below:

I myself have attended every performance of the local volunteer symphony for several years, and have thoroughly enjoyed it every time.

For more free writing tips and guidelines, free articles, and a free introductory consultation, visit Treasurefield Communications.

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About 123clear

I translate foggy information into plain English.
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