reflexive pronoun

A reflexive pronoun is personal pronoun with self or selves at the end. The singular forms of a reflective pronoun are myself, yourself, himself/herself/itself. The plural forms are ourselves, yourselves, themselves.

When the subject of a sentence or clause and the object of a verb or preposition are the same, a reflexive pronoun is the correct choice for the object. But often, writers and speakers use a reflexive pronoun when they shouldn’t, as in the following example:

Diane invited Betsy and myself to make blackberry jam with her on Friday afternoon.

Since the subject of this sentence is Diane, and the object of the verb, invited, is not Diane, there is no need for the reflexive. The correct wording is:

Diane invited Betsy and me to make blackberry jam with her on Friday afternoon.

Here’s another example. In this case, the writer should have used the reflexive:

Money is a powerful force. Unfortunately, people use the power of money against them.

Uh-uh. Since the subject is people and them reflects back to people, the reflexive form of them (themselves) is appropriate:

Money is a powerful force. Unfortunately, people use the power of money against themselves.

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About 123clear

I translate foggy information into plain English.
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