everyone (and not everyone)

TaraEven best-selling authors sometimes miss the precise meaning of what they are writing, and “everyone” is often used incorrectly. The example below is in The Law of Attraction, by Esther Hicks and Jerry Hicks:

Recognize that everyone you meet is not deliberate in their intending, but know that by your deliberate intending, you will be in control of your life experience.

In other words, this means, “Recognize that no one you meet is deliberate in their attending,” and it isn’t true. The people who read books by Esther and Jerry Hicks probably will meet people who are deliberate in their intending, because those with similar interests tend to turn up in the same classes and at the same events. Surely the Hickses know this, and they probably meant the following:

Recognize that not everyone you meet is deliberate in their intending, but know that by your deliberate intending, you will be in control of your life experience.

Notice how changing the location of the word “not” gives the sentence an entirely different meaning.

For more free writing tips, guidelines, and articles, visit Treasurefield Communications.

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About 123clear

I translate foggy information into plain English.
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