Excess Words

serpentLast weekend, I heard some word clutter over the radio:

It’s very crucial to leave our comfort zones to learn something new.

It’s absolutely critical that we tone down our rhetoric.

Since “crucial” means “essential,” there’s no need to modify it with “very.” Similarly, “critical” is “decisive,” “crucial,” and “a turning point”; modifying it with “absolutely” is a waste of the reader’s (and writer’s) time.

Here’s another example of clutter, taken from a novel. Notice that the “too” is extra, and that this sentence would read better without it:

Frankly, I was a little more than tired of both the anticipation and the rain, too.

The sentences below include even more clutter. When I heard them, I automatically, and perhaps unfairly, concluded that the speaker took so long to make his points because he’s pompous and arrogant:

The situation we have today is one where the two provinces remain politically divided.

I prefer something more simple and direct, like this:

Today, the two provinces remain politically divided.

The same speaker also said this:

We have a situation where there are going to be continued problems in that region.

Again, I prefer simplicity and directness:

There are going to be continued problems in that region. OR,

The problems in that region are going to continue.

What are your thoughts on this?
Cheers,

Tara Treasurefield
Treasurefield Communications

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About 123clear

I translate foggy information into plain English.
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