Once is Enough

horseThis sentence uses two words to achieve the same purpose. One would have been enough:

Frankly, I was a little more than tired of both the anticipation and the rain, too.

I found it in a mystery novel, and the sentences around it make it clear that either “both” or “too” would do:

Frankly, I was a little more than tired of both the anticipation and the rain.

Frankly, I was a little more than tired of the anticipation–and the rain, too.

Notice that I added a dash to the sentence that ends in “too”; without the dash, it would have a different meaning:

Frankly, I was a little more than tired of the anticipation and the rain, too.

Do you see the problem? Without the dash, “too” suggests that the writer isn’t the only one who is tired of the anticipation and the rain. Judging by the context, that wasn’t the writer’s intention.

Comments?

Cheers,

Tara Treasurefield
Treasurefield Communications

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About 123clear

I translate foggy information into plain English.
This entry was posted in clear thinking, clutter, conciseness, punctuation, repetition, word usage. Bookmark the permalink.

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