Winner Grammar Contest #2

dogDanielo, a self-described pathological contrarian, cycling snob, aspiring entertainer, anarchist, classical cynic, and jackass, is the winner of Grammar Contest #2. Congratulations, Danielo!

The challenge was to find the problem with the following sentence:

A beautiful high-pressure day of frosty crystalline air, blue skies, and brilliant sunshine.

Danielo wrote, “I would say that it lacks a predicate clause.”

That’s right. A sentence contains a subject (a noun or pronoun, with or without adjectives) and a predicate (a verb, with or without an object and/or adverbs). The example above is simply a long and elaborate clause consisting primarily of nouns (day, air, skies, sunshine) and adjectives (beautiful, high-pressure, frosty, crystalline, blue, brilliant). It doesn’t qualify as a sentence because there is no predicate, no verb, no action. This  beautiful clause just sits there.

To fix it, treat the clause as a subject by adding a predicate to the end:

A beautiful high-pressure day of frosty crystalline air, blue skies, and brilliant sunshine greeted her the next morning.

Another option is to attach a subject and predicate to the beginning of the clause:

It was a beautiful high-pressure day of frosty crystalline air, blue skies, and brilliant sunshine.

Comments?

Cheers,

Tara Treasurefield

Treasurefield Communications

Advertisements

About 123clear

I translate foggy information into plain English.
This entry was posted in clear thinking, sentence structure. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s