Monthly Archives: May 2008

Vocabulary Contest — Hint

Here is the vocabulary contest sentence:: The darkness said nothing when the light spoke; and the light shown in that darkness and the darkness was not. Here’s the hint: the incorrect word is a homophone–that is, it sounds like another … Continue reading

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Vocabulary Contest

This one is a piece of cake, folks: find the error in the sentence below. I’ll mention in this blogĀ  the name of the first person who responds with the correct answer. Here’s the sentence: The darkness said nothing when … Continue reading

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Call Up or Call On?

In yesterday’s post, I suggested the following alternative for a sentence I worked with: The House Judiciary Committee wants to be able to call on presidential aides to testify at the Committee’s whim. This morning I noticed that I had … Continue reading

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Rovian Usage

In a May 25 interview on ABC’s “This Week,” former White House official Karl Rove made it clear that he has no intention of complying with the subpoena the House Judiciary Committee recently served on him. He said: The House … Continue reading

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Conjunction Interruptus

This sentence has been twisting my mind around for days: He’s likely to get as many if not more than she is. As many as and more than are subordinating conjunctions that make comparisons. But in the sentence above, the … Continue reading

Posted in parts of speech, sentence structure, subordinate conjunction | 2 Comments

Who or Whom?

Whether to use who or whom is often confusing. Here’s an example of an incorrect choice: I haven’t spoken publicly until now as to who I would vote for. The sentence should actually read like this: I haven’t spoken publicly … Continue reading

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Concise–TOO Concise

It’s a good policy to keep your writing concise, tight. But it’s equally important to include all the essential words. Here’s an example of how omitting an essential word can change the meaning: Together, we can spread the dire need … Continue reading

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