Who or Whom?

Whether to use who or whom is often confusing. Here’s an example of an incorrect choice:

I haven’t spoken publicly until now as to who I would vote for.

The sentence should actually read like this:

I haven’t spoken publicly until now as to whom I would vote for.

Why? Because the subject of  the dependent clause “as to whom I would vote for” is I, and whom is the object of the preposition for.

By the way, don’t worry about the outdated rule against ending a sentence in a preposition, which The Chicago Manual of Style describes as “an unnecessary and pedantic restriction” and “an ill-founded superstition.”

Questions? Comments? Let me hear from you.

Cheers,

Tara Treasurefield
Tara’s Writing Studio

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About 123clear

I translate foggy information into plain English.
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